Raising Financially Freed-Up Kids (Kids thru Teens)

Kids are bombarded with hundreds of enticing and deceptive messages about money every single day. Raising Financially Freed-Up Kids gives parents hope that countering the influence of our broken culture is possible - but it doesn't happen by accident. Parents must be intentional in both words and actions. Author David Briggs help you do just that - offering proven principles and practical wisdom to guide you along the path of raising financially responsible and healthy kids.

Raising Financially Freedup Kids

Kids are bombarded with hundreds of enticing and deceptive messages about money every single day. Raising Financially Freed-Up Kids gives parents hope that countering the influence of our broken culture is possible - but it doesn't happen by accident. Parents must be intentional in both words and actions. Author David Briggs help you do just that - offering proven principles and practical wisdom to guide you along the path of raising financially responsible and healthy kids.

Strengths and Features

Long term perspective. Raising Financially Freed Up Kids emphasizes what will matter in 50 years (answer: "training, teaching and preparing our kids for life."). This long-term "big picture" view is presented as the antidote to a society suffering from "affluenza" - spurred on in part by hundreds of advertising and cultural messages aimed at kids that can be harmful to them financially and are often contrary to the teachings of Scripture.

Highly Practical. Raising Financially Freed Up Kids is built around seven keys for preparing kids to be financially responsible now and in the future:

  • Key #1 - Teach and Model Healthy Financial Practices. 80% parents believe that teaching good money habits is essential for their kids, but only 35% are actually doing anything about it. 
  • Key #2 - Prepare Kids to Survive in a Harsh Financial World. Sometimes we think we love our kids best by protecting them from harsh realties and making life as easy as possible - but what we are really doing is sending them into the real world handicapped.
  • Key #3 - Train Your Kids to Avoid the Dangers of Materialism. Our stuff takes so much time we have little time to devote to relationships, yet Jesus made it clear that the first and greatest commandment is about relationships - to God and to others.
  • Key #4 - Give Your Kids Authority for Financial Decisions. It's critical for kids to experience the financial ramifications - both positive and negative - of how they handle money. 
  • Key #5 - Teach Kids to Budget. Starting kids early on a simple budget is ...a cornerstone of good money management throughout life.
  • Key #6 - Teach Kids that Work is a Normal Part of Life. If kids don't work outside the home, then we have a special obligations to be sure they learn the connection between work and pay at home.
  • Key #7 - Teach Your Kids that God Cares about How They Handle Their Money and Possessions. The ultimate goal is for our children to...understand that everything we have has simply been entrusted to us by God and actually belongs to Him.

Creative Content. You'll find fresh ideas for using allowances as a learning tool for life in the "real world," three kinds of jobs that every child should experience at home, and specific ideas and action steps for kids at each developmental stage-from preschool through high school.

Format. The Raising Financially Freed-Up Kids program includes a DVD, Participant's Workbook, and a Facilitator's Guide. The Participant's Workbook (used with the DVD) will walk you through two Bible-based, ninety-minute sessions. The Facilitator's Guide (which contains ideas for promoting and setting up the class) is designed to be used in retreats, workshops, or small group studies. There is also a section which lays out age-appropriate approaches for teaching these principles.

Other Considerations

Table of Contents. Everything about this content is excellent: it's biblical, practical, creative, and easy to use. The only weakness discovered in this review was the Table of Contents in the front of the Participant's Workbook. It gives little help in locating specific elements of the otherwise outstanding content, simply referring readers to "Acknowledgements", "Session 1" and "Session 2."